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The ALISE 2016 Conference theme of “Radical Change: Inclusion and Innovation” celebrates the far reaching impact of Eliza T. Dresang’s work. The conference welcomes contributions that explore inclusive practices and innovative strategies in teaching and research, with special interest for Cultural Diversity, Digital Societies, Intellectual Freedom, Social Justice and International Resources.

Our logo for the conference is the metamorphosis of a caterpillar to a butterfly. This is a great symbol of radical change and transformation. Although the caterpillar and the butterfly exist in the same environment, each has its own perception and understanding of the world. As the caterpillar prepares for transformation, it must build the chrysalis, which acts as protection and change agent. When the radical change is completed, the butterfly emerges from the chrysalis into a new world, one of amazing potential and opportunity. The radical transformation and change allows the caterpillar to move beyond its small environment as a beautiful butterfly excited and ready to see and learn about its brave new world. 

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Monday, January 4
 

3:00pm EST

Board of Directors Meeting
Monday January 4, 2016 3:00pm - 7:00pm EST
Hancock (Mezzanine)
 
Tuesday, January 5
 

8:00am EST

Registration
Tuesday January 5, 2016 8:00am - 6:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

9:00am EST

Pre-Conference Workshop: Education to Innovate
The forum on “Envisioning Our Information Future and How to Educate for It,” supported by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and held in January 2015, engaged a diverse group of stakeholders—from directors of libraries, museums and archives, to digital humanities scholars, content providers, futurists, and information technology entrepreneurs—in intense discussion of the challenges and opportunities to which LIS education must respond (see http://infofuture.simmmons.edu). This interactive workshop at ALISE 2016 will be a follow up to that forum, engaging more LIS educators in discussions together with forum participants from other stakeholder groups in developing more specific proposals for innovations in LIS education.

Moderators
avatar for Eileen Abels

Eileen Abels

Dean and Professor, Simmons College, School of Library and Information Science
avatar for Linda Smith

Linda Smith

Professor and Associate Dean, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Linda C. Smith is professor and associate dean for academic programs in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She joined the faculty in 1977. She works with graduate students on-campus (MS, CAS, PhD) and, since 1997, online (MS, CAS... Read More →

Tuesday January 5, 2016 9:00am - 12:00pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

1:00pm EST

ALISE Academy

The 2016 ALISE Academy

 Goal: This year the Academy’s objective is to engage participants in a thoughtful discussion about the nature of change in organizations and how we can educate library and information professionals to lead change and spark innovation. Attendees will leave the Academy with action strategies for leading change and incorporating these ideas into the curriculum.

Format: First, a panel of four experts in LIS education will share their perspectives on the theme of change in organizations, from dealing with radical change to preparing professionals to be change agents. A question and answer session with the panelists will get the conversation started among participants about how to incorporate new ideas about managing change into their practice.

Second, there will be a book talk and discussion on Quick and Nimble, by Adam Bryant of the New York Times (see http://www.quickandnimble.net/). Summaries, discussion guides, and conversation starters will be provided for participants.

Bryant offers perspectives on how organizational culture affects change and other issues of leadership. Developed from “The Corner Office” interviews published in the New York Times, Quick and Nimble distills numerous voices and perspectives on developing and sustaining an organization’s culture and functionality.  Leaders and managers from technology companies, higher education, and non-profit organizations discuss philosophies and practices intended to ensure that employees remain responsive and focused on shared aims.  The different perspectives presented in this volume mean that Bryant’s book does not offer a single answer or a correct way to foster innovation; instead, several themes and issues are used to present strategies for creating purposive, positive work environments.

Schedule

1:00-1:15 – Introductory remarks, introductions

1:15-2:30 – Expert panel: Dr. Kendra Albright, Professor, University of South Carolina; Dr. John Carlo Bertot, Professor, University of Maryland; Dr. Ken Haycock, Professor, University of Southern California; Dr. Kate McDowell, Associate Professor, University of Illinois

2:30-2:45 – Break

2:45-3:30 – Book discussion

3:30 p.m. – Concluding remarks


Speakers/Authors
avatar for Kendra Albright

Kendra Albright

Associate Professor, University of South Carolina
Editor-in-Chief, Libri Talk to me about publishing your research.
avatar for John Bertot

John Bertot

Professor, University of Maryland, College of Information Studies
avatar for Ken Haycock

Ken Haycock

Research Professor, University of Southern California
Ken Haycock is research professor of management and organization in the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California, where he is director of graduate programs in library and information management. He was previously director of LIS programs at San Jose and... Read More →
avatar for Kate McDowell

Kate McDowell

Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Graduate School of Library and Information Science University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
youth services, student affairs at LIS schools, research on children and apps


Tuesday January 5, 2016 1:00pm - 3:45pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

1:00pm EST

Board of Directors Meeting
Tuesday January 5, 2016 1:00pm - 4:00pm EST
Hancock (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

4:00pm EST

ALISE unConference Special Session

We are excited to announce the return of the unconference to ALISE 2016 annual conference! It will be one of the first events taking place at ALISE and will occur before the Opening Reception/Works in Progress Poster Session.

The unConference is a loosely structured session emphasizing the informal exchange of information and ideas between participants where YOU pick the topics and the content. Visit our online form for the agenda and to start contributing ideas for topics and content.

The unConference is scheduled for Tuesday, January 5th from 4:00 p.m. - 6:15 p.m.

Please email Elise Lewis or Heather Moorefield-Lang with any questions you may have regarding the unConference.


Tuesday January 5, 2016 4:00pm - 6:15pm EST
Grand Ballroom B (Plaza) - (Mezzanine)

4:30pm EST

5:30pm EST

5:30pm EST

ALISE Committee Meetings
Tuesday January 5, 2016 5:30pm - 6:30pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

6:30pm EST

 
Wednesday, January 6
 

7:30am EST

7:30am EST

First Timers' Breakfast
Wednesday January 6, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am EST
Terrace (Lower Level)

7:30am EST

SIG Business Meetings: Session 1

Archival/Preservation Education
Doctoral Students
Distance Education
Gender Issues
Information Ethics
Part-Time and Adjunct Faculty


Wednesday January 6, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

7:30am EST

Registration
Wednesday January 6, 2016 7:30am - 6:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

Exhibits
Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

unCommons

ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, our Internet Café, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

The unCommons hours will be Wednesday, January 6, and Thursday, January 7 from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m, and Friday, January 8 from 8 a.m. - 12 noon.


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:00am - 6:00pm EST
Grand Ballroom B (Plaza) - (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

8:30am EST

Session 1.1 A Juried Paper: Innovation: Information professional activities within the Fanfiction community
Fanfiction communities were examined through a serious leisure (Stebbins, 2007) lens in order to see the types of Information professional activities were performed. Three themes are discussed. 1. wayfinding (peer review, information provision, and creating guides to the literature 2. Collecting (activities associated with collection development) 3. Organizing (ways that fanfiction communities classify and categorize)

Speakers/Authors
HH

Heather Hill

The University of Western Ontario
Associate Professor, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, Western University
JP

Jen Pecoskie

Wayne State University


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 1.1 B Juried Paper: Visualization of Co-Read Book Data at Goodreads.com: A Potential Readers’ Advisory Tool
Readers’ Advisory services face a number of challenges, including the ever-increasing number of published titles, and big data available on patron reading habits. We explore a method of combining data from Goodreads, a reading social network, with traditional bibliometric techniques to augment readers’ advisory based on frequently co-read pairs of books. This study also examines the effect of so-called “blockbuster” titles on recommendations.

Speakers/Authors
WJ

Wooseob Jeong

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States of America
LR

Laura Ridenour

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, United States of America


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 1.1 C Juried Paper: The Role of Social Location and Back, Civil, and Forbidden Spaces in the Information Practices of LGBTQ Individuals
Drawing from results of 15 in-depth interviews with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and/or questioning (LGBTQ) individuals, this exploratory study examines how information practices differ based on social location (i.e., the social construction of place). Preliminary findings uncovered how socio-cultural context influences participants’ information practices in exploring, negotiating, and adopting LGBTQ identities. Findings suggest further avenues of study that can inform future LIS investigations that yield a more nuanced understanding of facilitators and barriers to information access rooted within one’s social location and personal spaces, including those of underrepresented/stigmatized groups.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Vanessa L. Kitzie

Vanessa L. Kitzie

Ph.D. Candidate, Rutgers University
avatar for Marie L. Radford

Marie L. Radford

Professor & Director, PhD Program, Rutgers University, NJ
Research interest in interpersonal communication, assessment, virtual reference, qualitative methods, & postmodern approaches to librarian, library, and research process stereotypes.


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 1.2 SIG Session: Innovative Pedagogies in LIS Education
Through lightning rounds, the Innovative Pedagogies SIG reflects on teaching strategies, theories, practices, and curricula ideas, alongside themes of radical change: inclusion and innovation in LIS education.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Anthony Bernier

Anthony Bernier

San Jose State Univeristy
Public library services and history, YA, critical theory, LIS accreditation.
avatar for Marika Cifor

Marika Cifor

Indiana University Bloomington
avatar for Nicole Amy Cooke

Nicole Amy Cooke

Assistant Profesor, MS/LIS Program Director, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois
Nicole A. Cooke is an Assistant Professor, and Director of the MS/LIS program, at the School of Information Sciences, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She holds an M.Ed in Adult Education from Pennsylvania State University, and an MLS and a Ph.D. in Communication, Information... Read More →
KD

Keren Dali

Western University, Ontario, Canada
RG

Rich Gazan

University of Hawaii
avatar for Judi Moreillon

Judi Moreillon

Assistant Professor, Texas Woman’s University
For ALISE 2015, I am most interested in discussing why the term "social justice" seems to be more allusive in our literature than in the librarianship literature of other countries, such as the United Kingdom. I believe this term should be more widely applied to library services and... Read More →
SW

Stacy Wood

PhD Candidate in Information Studies, UCLA
Stacy Wood is a PhD candidate in Information Studies at UCLA. Her dissertation, Making Secret(s) examines the infrastructure supporting classified information in the United States. She is a critical scholar of archives and information policy focusing on the legal and cultural lives... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 1.3 ALISE Awards and Papers
  • ALISE Research Grant Competition 2015 Update
  • ALISE/ProQuest Methodology Paper Competition 2016
  • ALISE/Bohdan S. Wynar Research Paper 2016

Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 1.4 Juried Panel: Radical Change and Ethical Practice in the LIS Classroom
This panel will demonstrate how connecting foundational concepts in information ethics with innovations in ethical practice can promote novel approaches in teaching the ethical components of the LIS curriculum. The panel will include discussion and audience participation designed to promote scholarly collaboration on this topic going forward.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for John Burgess

John Burgess

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
avatar for Emily Knox

Emily Knox

Assistant Professor, School of Information Sciences,, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Emily is an associate professor in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her book, Book Banning in 21st Century America, was published by Rowman & Littlefield and she also recently edited Trigger Warnings: History, Theory Context, also... Read More →
LM

Lorraine Mon

Florida State University
avatar for Heather B. Perry

Heather B. Perry

Simmons College
JM

Jessica M. Ross

The University of Alabama
JS

Jennifer Steele

The University of Alabama



Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 1.5 SIG Session: Radical Changes in Information Technology: Tapping into Gender Diverse Talent Pools
This presentation highlights: 1) recent research about continued gender inequality in STEM disciplines; 2) Rutger's initiatives to create a diverse community in its Information Technology and Informatics program, including the formation of networking opportunities targeted to women. Veering away from tech-centric curriculum, this program focuses on the intersection of technology, people and context/use.

Moderators
avatar for Lesley Farmer

Lesley Farmer

Professor, California State University
Dr. Farmer, CSU Long Beach Professor, coordinates its Teacher Librarianship program, and manages CSU's ICT Literacy Project. She chairs CSLA's CSI and the Research Committee. She has over 30 published books, 100s of articles and book chapters.
KS

Kristen Schuster

University of Missouri

Speakers/Authors
RR

Rebecca Reynolds

Rutgers University
avatar for Sharon Stoerger

Sharon Stoerger

Assistant Dean for Instructional Support and Assessment, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Dr. Sharon Stoerger is the Assistant Dean for Instructional Support and Assessment for the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers. Previously Dr. Stoerger was director of the Information Technology and Informatics (ITI) program, assistant teaching professor, and co-founder... Read More →



Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 1.6 A Juried Paper: LIS Student Engagement in Systematic Program Planning: Inclusion, Impact, and Innovation
Presents the results of a qualitative content analysis of 15 Program Presentations for evidence of the inclusion of student voices and perspectives in systematic planning: the various student engagement methods used, how frequently and consistently these methods are used, and the tangible programmatic improvements that result. Highlights unique and innovate approaches that will aid programs in creating inclusive decision-making processes, collaborating with students to implement change, and complying with the ALA accreditation Standards.

Speakers/Authors
BK

Bill Kules

The Catholic University of America
avatar for Elizabeth Lieutenant

Elizabeth Lieutenant

MSL(I)S Candidate, The Catholic University of America
Elizabeth Lieutenant is a master’s student at The Catholic University of America and will be graduating in May 2016. Her academic, scholarly, and professional experience and interests include higher education planning and assessment, student leadership development, academic librarianship... Read More →



Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 1.6 B Juried Paper: Transforming LIS Students into a Mobile Workforce for 21st Century Libraries
Based on secondary analysis of the experiences and advice offered by librarians and IT professionals engaged in developing mobile applications and mobile sites (MAMS) for libraries, we identify four core and six supplementary competencies needed to help libraries better serve their patrons using MAMS. The core competencies include mobile application development, human-computer interaction, computer networking, and planning and management of mobile technologies. Project management, change management, negotiation, data management, policy management, and grant writing are the supplementary competencies that would transform LIS students into a mobile workforce capable of helping libraries make smart choices for serving their patrons using MAMS.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Devendra Potnis

Devendra Potnis

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
My interdisciplinary research focuses on the application of information and communication technologies (e.g., e-Books, mobile apps, information systems, websites, etc.) for the development of society (including libraries), governments, and businesses. In particular, my research projects... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 1.6 C Juried Paper: Trends of LIS education for Data Professionals
As data has become critical to our everyday lives, a growing concern with the skills gap required to exploit the data surfeit has arisen. The library and information science practitioners and educators have recognized such concern. This paper is intended to identify current trends in LIS education in response to rising demand for data professionals and data expertise in the library workforce.

Speakers/Authors
JA

Jeonghyun {Annie} Kim

University of North Texas, United States of America


Wednesday January 6, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

10:00am EST

Morning Break
Wednesday January 6, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Opening Plenary Session: President's Program: Ode to Eliza Dresang

Emerging scholars will discuss how Eliza Dresang’s Theory of Radical Change has influenced their own work and how they are taking Radical Change beyond books and into new areas of research.  The presentations will focus on RC as a framework for understanding and explaining emerging learning spaces (i.e., Makerspaces); VIEWS2, a project initiated by Dresang that incorporated the principles of RC in its research design; and digital games and social media as reflecting the principles of RC.   Harry Bruce (Dean, University of Washington) will serve as discussant, offering a context for understanding Dresang’s influence on a new generation of scholars.  


Moderators
avatar for Annette Y Goldsmith

Annette Y Goldsmith

Librarian, Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel
avatar for Don Latham

Don Latham

Professor, Florida State University, School of Information
Information literacy, digital literacies, youth services, young adult literature

Speakers/Authors
KC

Kathleen Campana

PhD Candidate, University of Washington, United States of America
avatar for Jonathan Hollister

Jonathan Hollister

Doctoral Candidate, Florida State University
avatar for Kyungwon Koh

Kyungwon Koh

Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma


Wednesday January 6, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

12:15pm EST

12:30pm EST

Birds of a Feather
Wednesday January 6, 2016 12:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

12:45pm EST

SIG Business Meetings: Session 2

New Faculty
Historical Perspectives
Multicultural, Ethnic, and Humanistic Concern
Technical Services Education


Wednesday January 6, 2016 12:45pm - 1:45pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

12:45pm EST

SIG Business Meetings: Session 2B (School Library Media)

School Library Media


Wednesday January 6, 2016 12:45pm - 1:45pm EST
Newbury (4th Floor)

1:00pm EST

JELIS Editorial Board Meeting
Wednesday January 6, 2016 1:00pm - 2:00pm EST
Hancock (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.1 A Juried Paper: Effecting Radical Change: Understanding High School Principals’ Views of Teacher and Librarian Collaboration
High school principals were surveyed about their experiences with and perceptions of collaboration between classroom teachers and school and public librarians to promote student acquisition of 21st Century Skills. The findings suggest that principals see collaboration as important to student learning, although much more so in the case of teachers and school librarians than with public librarians. Given the key role principal support plays in successful teacher and librarian collaboration, the findings have significant implications for developing an intervention that will lead to improved collaboration between teachers and librarians to teach 21st Century Skills.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Don Latham

Don Latham

Professor, Florida State University, School of Information
Information literacy, digital literacies, youth services, young adult literature


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.1 B Juried Paper: Online Peer Support: Enhancing the Research Culture among LIS Practitioners
The Institute of Research Design for Librarianship (IRDL) is a federally funded program that provides professional development opportunities and a support system for academic librarians to improve their research skills and research output. A study is being conducted to examine how the IRDL participants stay connected and provide support for each other in their research activities via online venues. The study seeks to develop an online peer support model that could inform the design of online training programs on research methods for LIS professionals, and the establishment of an active online community about LIS practitioner research.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Lili Luo, PhD.

Lili Luo, PhD.

San Jose State University School of Information
Associate Professor, School of Information, San Jose State University


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.1 C Juried Paper: An Examination of Avid Young Readers’ Blogs
Drawing from work on gendered literacy, this qualitative study compares book blogs of young male and female avid readers, with the goal of understanding how they perceive themselves as readers; what they read; and their reading contexts. In doing so, it compares these findings with dissertation findings relating to bloggers’ (including librarians, parents, and teachers) gendered assumptions about boys’ and girls’ reading preferences.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Emily Mae Seitz

Emily Mae Seitz

Recent graduate (Rutgers University, May 2015), United States of America


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.2 Juried Panel: Instruction for Inclusion: Addressing Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the LIS Curriculum
On this panel, faculty members will examine how questions of race, gender, and sexuality can impact teaching and learning, and discuss steps they have taken to integrate instruction on these topics throughout the curriculum, both in core courses and through the development of electives and special topics courses.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Denice Adkins

Denice Adkins

Associate Professor, School of Information Science & Learning Technologies
avatar for Emily Drabinski

Emily Drabinski

Long Island University
JG

Joyce Gabiola

Simmons College, United States of America
LH

Lisa Hussey

Simmons College
avatar for Laura Saunders

Laura Saunders

Assistant Professor, Simmons College


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.3 SIG Session: Foreign language study in the LIS curriculum: A cross-cultural comparison of two innovative programs
Why do some LIS students choose foreign language study as part of their professional preparation? How do they use foreign language skills in their work? Panelists will describe the role of foreign language courses in the MLIS curricula at their institutions in the U.S. and Honduras, and will present results from surveys of current students and alumni to explain the value of foreign language study in Library & Information Science.

Moderators
avatar for Linda L. Lillard

Linda L. Lillard

Professor and Department Chair and Program Director, Clarion University

Speakers/Authors
NC

Nítida Carranza

Universidad Pedagógica Nacional Francisco Morazán, Honduras
DF

Debbie Faires

San José State University, United States
CF

Charlotte Ford

Universidad Pedagógica Nacional Francisco Morazán, Honduras;nBirmingham-Southern College, United States
avatar for Sandy Hirsh

Sandy Hirsh

Associate Dean for Academics, San Jose State University
Dr. Sandra Hirsh is Associate Dean for Academics in the College of Professional and Global Education at San José State University. She previously served as Professor and Director of the School of Information at San José State University for ten years from 2010-2020. Prior to joining... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.4 A Juried Paper: Connected Learning Meets Radical Change: A Conference in a Classroom
Connected learning partnered with Radical Change theory provided the framework for a brand-new culminating course in the youth services track at the University of Washington Information School. The authors taught the course in Spring 2015 using a conference-like model based on the late Dr. Eliza T. Dresang’s outline. Innovative delivery methods engaged both online and residential students, deliberately seeking to change boundaries, change perspectives, and change formats in how programs for digital youth are planned, delivered, and evaluated.

Speakers/Authors
KC

Kathleen Campana

PhD Candidate, University of Washington, United States of America
avatar for Annette Y Goldsmith

Annette Y Goldsmith

Librarian, Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel
JE

J. Elizabeth Mills

PhD Candidate, Information School, University of Washington
I have most recently been a research assistant on Project VIEWS2, a study of early literacy in public library storytimes using measurement tools based on early learning benchmarks. My own research explores the role of culture in public library storytimes as a way to include and welcome... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.4 B Juried Paper: “Who are the Librarians?” Bringing Practitioner Inquiry into the LIS Classroom
This critical essay proposes practitioner inquiry as an effective pedagogical model to teach pre-service librarians ways to embrace their personal diversities for the purpose of more effective professional practice. Because librarianship enacts various forms of text and literature, practitioner inquiry for librarians most effectively involves some kind of interaction with literature. This research suggests the veracity of LIS professionals embracing a practice of systematic, collaborative self-study for the purpose of lifelong learning and professional development.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Vanessa Irvin

Vanessa Irvin

Assistant Professor, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Vanessa Irvin, MSLS, EdD, is an Assistant Professor with the Library and Information Science Program at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Dr. Irvin’s areas of teaching and research include: reference services, public libraries, youth services, and librarian professional development... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.4 C Juried Paper: Radical Changes in the Roles of School Librarians
The role of school librarians has a history of radical change. From early beginnings as reference librarians for school libraries, school librarians adapted to take on responsibility for technology with the introduction of audio-visual materials in schools. With the advent of the Information Age in the middle of the 20th century and the subsequent development of personal computers and the Internet, the American Library Association (ALA) recommended schools and colleges begin integrating information literacy into students’ learning (1989). Today school librarians are entering another period of radical change as they combine their information specialist roles with technology integration.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Lois Wine

Lois Wine

Doctoral Student, Old Dominion University, United States of America
I am pursuing a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction with a School Library cognate. My research interests are collaboration and information literacy.


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.5 A Juried Paper: The Use of Inquiry-Based Science Instruction and Award Winning Literature in the Library: Exploring a Radical Change in Library Lessons
This research examines a mixed methods, quasi-experimental study utilizing award winning science literature and hands-on, inquiry-based instruction with preschool students. Reasoning for the necessity of this type of instruction is explored through the lens of radical change. Three different methods of instruction are employed and examined. The researcher explores the most effective and most preferred methods of instruction, as determined by the students. Surprising post-test results are revealed.

Speakers/Authors
BR

Bree Ruzzi

Old Dominion University, United States of America


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.5 B Juried Paper: Camp Read-a-Rama: Fully Engaged Literacy Learning
Camp Read-a-Rama, a summer day camp based in South Carolina for 4 to 11 year olds, uses children’s books as the springboard for all other camp activities. For six summers, camp has provided children fully-engaged fun while offering themed literacy immersion experiences that turn “summer slide” into “summer stride.” This three-year research study found a statistically significant difference in pre and post testing designed to determine whether camp helped to improve campers’ attitudes toward reading and literature.  The pairing of hands-on learning with reading also positively impacted their literacy.

Speakers/Authors
CC

Clayton Copeland

Faculty, School of Library & Information Science, USC
Dr. Clayton Copeland is on faculty with the University of South Carolina's School of Library and Information Science and serves as director of LLEAD, the school's Laboratory for Leadership in Equity of Access and Diversity. Dr. Copeland's research focuses upon equity of access to... Read More →
MH

Michelle H Martin

University of South Carolina, United States of America
KW

Kayla Washington

University of South Carolina, United States of America


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.5 C Juried Paper: Information for inclusion: Assessing sociocultural contextual factors to support Filipino newcomers’ settlement to Canada
Drawing from dissertation research conducted with Filipino migrants to Winnipeg, Canada, this paper examines newcomer information practices during migration and settlement suggesting that how newcomer communities engage with and become involved with settlement information has direct implications for the methods that information professionals might use to reach them. It considers the complex relationship between the sociocultural contextual factors that inform how Filipino migrants engage in information practices and the strategies that information professionals might use to support this and other migrant populations as they migrate and settle in new and unknown locations.

Speakers/Authors
DA

Danielle Allard

University of Toronto


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.6 A Juried Paper: FRBR, conceptual knowledge and Harry Potter: radical change and innovative solutions in cataloging education
The advent of FRBR has brought radical changes to cataloging education, as this rich and complex set of models shapes cataloging in our modern, digital age. This paper will discuss the impact of FRBR’s conceptual models on cataloging teaching, such as conflicting opinions about the required extent and depth of FRBR teaching, and the radical changes that FRBR brings to cataloging educators. Examples of innovative FRBR teaching techniques will be given, acting as a starting point to explore how FRBR can influence pedagogy, and demonstrating why familiar worlds such as Harry Potter are useful when teaching FRBR.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Deborah Theresa Lee

Deborah Theresa Lee

PhD student, City University, London, United Kingdom


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.6 B Juried Paper: Enhancing Key Digital Literacy Skills in Library and Information Science Curricula: Report of a Knowledge Synthesis
The technological and social context has increased the demand for skills and knowledge in the areas of information privacy, security and ownership, which are key aspects of digital literacy. These, however, are difficult to teach. This paper addresses this problem through a synthesis of current knowledge by (1) documenting the demand for expertise in these three areas of digital literacy; (2) assessing the ways in which LIS curricula works to develop adequate and sustainable skills in these three areas of digital literacy; (3) establishing a comprehensive curriculum that will provide optimal training in these areas for LIS professionals.

Speakers/Authors
AF

Alexandre Fortier

University of Western Ontario, Canada
avatar for Lisa Di Valentino

Lisa Di Valentino

Ph.D. candidate, University of Western Ontario, Canada


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.6 C Juried Paper: Awareness and use of altmetrics among LIS scholars and faculty
Altmetrics measure the impact of scholarship via mentions in social media and other non-traditional venues. For LIS faculty, altmetrics are also a new area for research. The focus of this presentation is the results of a survey of LIS scholars’ awareness and use of altmetrics.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Dr. Sarah Sutton

Dr. Sarah Sutton

Associate Professor of Library and Information Man, Emporia State University School of Library and Information Management
I'm currently on the faculty of the School of Library and Information Management at Emporia State University where I teach information organization, collection development, and, of course, e-resources management. I love to talk about what practicing librarians in serials and e-resources... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 2.7 Juried Panel: Radical Change in library learning spaces: Research on Makerspaces
Makerspaces are innovative learning spaces where the concepts of Radical Change are manifested in both resources and user behaviors. This panel features five cutting-edge research projects on Makerspaces across the country. Audience will learn about library Makerspaces and discuss their implications for LIS educators and researchers.

Speakers/Authors
JA

June Abbas

University of Oklahoma
avatar for Leanne Bowler

Leanne Bowler

Associate Professor, University of PIttsburgh
Leanne Bowler is an Associate Professor, Director of the Sara Fine Institute for Interpersonal Behavior and Technology at the School of Computing and Information, and Co-Chair of the Department of Information Culture and Data Stewardship at the University of Pittsburgh. Her teaching... Read More →
avatar for Kyungwon Koh

Kyungwon Koh

Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma
avatar for Heather Moorefield-Lang

Heather Moorefield-Lang

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
Heather is an assistant professor for the School of Library and Information Science at The University of South Carolina. She is the former chair of the AASL Best Websites for Teaching and Learning Committee. The focus of her research is in technology in libraries and schools with... Read More →
avatar for Rebekah Willett

Rebekah Willett

Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison
I currently teach courses on young adult literature, multicultural literature for children and young adults, pedagogy, informational divides, and online participatory cultures. I have conducted research on children’s media cultures, focusing on issues of gender, play, literacy... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Whittier (4th Floor)

3:30pm EST

Afternoon Break
Wednesday January 6, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.1 A Juried Paper: The GSLIS Carnegie Scholars
From 1970-1972 GSLIS welcomed twenty-eight students of color known as The Carnegie Scholars. A program to increase the numbers of minority librarians, the program denoted a radical change, for the better, at the school; it is a radical change we need to see again going forward. LIS programs need to think critically about the recruitment and retention of students of color. Investigation of the Carnegie Scholars Program, and other historical initiatives, could facilitate a new radical change in LIS education.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Nicole Amy Cooke

Nicole Amy Cooke

Assistant Profesor, MS/LIS Program Director, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois
Nicole A. Cooke is an Assistant Professor, and Director of the MS/LIS program, at the School of Information Sciences, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She holds an M.Ed in Adult Education from Pennsylvania State University, and an MLS and a Ph.D. in Communication, Information... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.1 B Juried Paper: Getting Beyond Green: Radical Change Theory Broadens the Spectrum of Sustainability for LIS Education
Radical change theory urges connectivity, collaboration and fresh perspectives. As the information environment evolves, practitioners are currently teaching themselves and others about "sustainability" (the ecological, economic, and equitable circumstances affected by changes to the environment) without input from LIS accredited programs. Inspired by radical change theory, this paper offers a rationale for adding sustainability to the LIS curriculum. It explains sustainability concepts and their fit with LIS, as practitioners well know. The paper concludes with collaborative scenarios that illustrate the potential sustainability offers for educating current students, alumni, and others interested in professional development.

Speakers/Authors
TJ

Tonyia J Tidline

University of Alberta


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.1 C Juried Paper: LIS Professionals and Social Work: Facilitating the Change and Transition of Immigration
The paper will make a case for modeling courses on the immigration experience in LIS programs after the graduate courses in Social Work. An understanding of the immigration transition is essential for librarians who want to become true agents of change in immigrants’ life, beyond the initial period of resettlement. The paper will draw on the interviews with public librarians serving immigrant communities in Canada and the U.S. and the comparative analysis of the LIS and Social Work curricula. Given the converging nature of the two fields, this paper will present a model for the restructuring of other user-oriented LIS courses.

Speakers/Authors
KD

Keren Dali

Western University, Ontario, Canada


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.2 A Juried Paper: Old Skills, New Practices Mean Radical Change for Library Education
Technological advances and other societal change have resulted in public libraries' increased reliance on online resources for offering services. However, a portion of those served by public libraries includes members of urban poor populations who prefer to interact with information by talking. Research conducted to articulate service models that public libraries can use to meet the information needs of this constituency reveals how current service practices involve a radical twist on traditional skills. Discussion following the presentation of findings includes recommendations for library management curricula that better prepare graduates to apply age-old professional practices in radical new ways.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Deborah Turner

Deborah Turner

Assistant Professor, Drexel University


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.2 B Juried Paper: Approaches to Knowledge in Libraries and in Library and Information Science
This presentation foregrounds questions about the theorization of and approach to knowledge as they apply to research, teaching, and practice in the library profession. Starting with William H. Wisner’s complaint that what he calls postmodern libraries prioritize information over knowledge, it explores the responses of LIS theorists on the subject of knowledge as well as pertinent views by others outside the discipline. The authors, who approach the topic of knowledge as librarians who started their careers as scholars in other disciplines, aim to develop a curricular focus on knowledge studies in LIS education.

Speakers/Authors
JH

Jay H Bernstein

Kingsborough Community College - CUNY, United States of America
JW

James W Marcum

Queens College - CUNY, United States of America


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.2 C Juried Paper: Historical inquiry as a form of innovation: Encouraging the development of dynamic professional identities in librarianship
Librarianship has been, and will continue to be, influenced by historical events, but LIS programs do not consistently convey this throughout their curricula. Consequently, it is not always clear to emerging professionals how discipline specific processes and practices that have contributed to the development and growth of a shared professional identity. This paper will discuss how historical inquiry, as a pedagogical tool, can encourage LIS students to conceptualize their work as a process that uses inquiry and collaboration to better serve their communities.

Speakers/Authors
KS

Kristen Schuster

University of Missouri


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.3 Juried Panel: Cultural Heritage Informatics at Simmons: Towards an Innovative Case-based Curriculum
In this interactive panel session we will discuss the challenges and opportunities we have encountered in building new programs in Cultural Heritage Informatics (CHI) at Simmons. We will describe our ongoing project to develop case studies and teaching scenarios for use in CHI courses, which we hope will contribute to the development of CHI as an interdisciplinary field of study, spanning the historic divisions among libraries, archives, and museums. The session also will be an opportunity for audience members to discuss ideas for new case studies and for using cases in CHI curricula.

Speakers/Authors
PB

Peter Botticelli

Simmons College, United States of America
avatar for Michele Cloonan

Michele Cloonan

Professor, Simmons College
Michèle Cloonan came to the Simmons College School of Library and Information Science in August 2002. She was dean and professor through December 2012 and is now dean emerita and professor. Previously, she was chair and associate professor, Department of Information Studies, UCLA... Read More →
MM

Martha Mahard

Professor, Simmons College, United States of America
After a long career in special collections and the art and design libraries of Harvard University I have been teaching at Simmons GSLIS for 20 years (full-time for the last 9) and have recently helped establish a new concentration in Cultural Heritage Informatics which combines art... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.4 SIG Session: Radical Change and Youth Services in Library and Information Science: A Participatory YS SIG - Panel Discussing the Impact of Radical Change Theory in Youth Services
This participatory panel will highlight six short papers that offer examples for the transformation of youth services in library and information science through the integration of Radical Change theory themes of interactivity, connectivity and access in the LIS classroom and beyond.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Maria Cahill

Maria Cahill

Associate Professor, University of Kentucky
Maria Cahill is an associate professor in the School of Information Science and the Department of Educational Leadership Studies at the University of Kentucky. Cahill earned an MLIS at the University of South Carolina and a PhD in Literacy Education from the University of Tennessee... Read More →
KC

Kathleen Campana

PhD Candidate, University of Washington, United States of America
avatar for Sabrina Carnesi

Sabrina Carnesi

Doctoral Student & NNPS Librarian, Old Dominion, United States of America
I am in my second year as a doctoral student at ODU. I am also the school librarian at Crittenden Middle School in Newport News, VA. I have be a K12 educator for 3 decades.
avatar for Liya Deng

Liya Deng

University of South Carolina
avatar for Colette Drouillard

Colette Drouillard

Assistant Professor, Valdosta State University, United States of America
AF

Andrea Forte

University of Washington, United States of America
avatar for Annette Y Goldsmith

Annette Y Goldsmith

Librarian, Sephardic Temple Tifereth Israel
AG

Adriane Grumbien

The University of Kentucky, United States of America
KH

KaaVonia Hinton

Old Dominion, United States of America
KH

Kyra Hunting

The University of Kentucky, United States of America
avatar for Kyungwon Koh

Kyungwon Koh

Assistant Professor, The University of Oklahoma
RM

Rachel Magee

University of Washington, United States of America
JE

J. Elizabeth Mills

PhD Candidate, Information School, University of Washington
I have most recently been a research assistant on Project VIEWS2, a study of early literacy in public library storytimes using measurement tools based on early learning benchmarks. My own research explores the role of culture in public library storytimes as a way to include and welcome... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.5 Juried Panel: Lifelong Learning for Librarians: Building Expertise in Research Methods
Library systems and assessment activities often generate massive amounts of data, especially about the behavior of library users. The collection and use of these data raise complicated issues of privacy, ethics, and social justice, which are not unique to libraries, but in which libraries are key institutional actors. It is therefore crucial to consider how education and training in quantitative and qualitative research methods can help situate and critique policies around institutional data collection and use.

Speakers/Authors
AA

Andrew Asher

Associate Professor and Assessment Librarian, Indiana University-Bloomington
avatar for Chris Bourg

Chris Bourg

Director of Libraries, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chris Bourg is the Director of Libraries at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she also has oversight of the MIT Press. Prior to assuming her role at MIT, Chris worked for 12 years in the Stanford University Libraries, most recently as the Associate University Librarian... Read More →
avatar for Lynn Connaway

Lynn Connaway

OCLC Research
DL

Donna Lanclos

University of North Carolina Charlotte
MS

Maura Smale

Chief Librarian, NYC College of Technology
Preferred Gender Pronouns: She/HerBio: Maura Smale is Chief Librarian and Professor at the Ursula C. Schwerin Library, New York City College of Technology (City Tech), and faculty in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Smale was... Read More →


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

Session 3.6 SIG Session: The Global Classroom: Strategies for Designing Innovative Cultural Immersion Programs in Library and Information Science Education
The Global Classroom provides opportunities for students to gain knowledge, exposure and experience, and to think beyond the confines of geographic boundaries. Moreover, global study programs help prepare students to face the new challenges, and to understand the interconnectedness and interdependence of the world (IFLA, 2012) This presentation will discuss models for designing cultural immersion programs in LIS education through coursework and experiential learning through study abroad, internships, and volunteer projects.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Susan Alman

Susan Alman

San José State University
Online education, MOOCs, Emerging Future of Technology, Marketing, Interpersonal Communication, International collaboration with the University of the Witwatersrand Library.
avatar for Sandy Hirsh

Sandy Hirsh

Associate Dean for Academics, San Jose State University
Dr. Sandra Hirsh is Associate Dean for Academics in the College of Professional and Global Education at San José State University. She previously served as Professor and Director of the School of Information at San José State University for ten years from 2010-2020. Prior to joining... Read More →
SL

Shari Lee

St. John's University
PW

Peta Wellstead

San José State University


Wednesday January 6, 2016 4:00pm - 5:30pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

5:45pm EST

 
Thursday, January 7
 

7:30am EST

7:30am EST

7:30am EST

SIG Business Meetings: Session 3

Curriculum
Development and Fundraising
Information Policy
International Library Education
Research


Thursday January 7, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

7:30am EST

7:30am EST

Registration
Thursday January 7, 2016 7:30am - 6:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

Exhibits
Thursday January 7, 2016 8:00am - 5:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

unCommons

ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, our Internet Café, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

The unCommons hours will be Wednesday, January 6, and Thursday, January 7 from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m, and Friday, January 8 from 8 a.m. - 12 noon.


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:00am - 6:00pm EST
Grand Ballroom B (Plaza) - (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

8:30am EST

Session 4.1 Juried Panel: Radical Change? Transitioning from Faculty to Administrator
Have you thought about moving from faculty to administrator? Has your organization pressed you to take on a leadership role? Do you wonder if it would be a good move professionally and if a leadership position of this type will fulfill your X needs? This session will feature four LIS Program Administrators discussing the ins and outs, ups and downs of their lives as administrators, as well as their insights for those contemplating an administrative appointment in the years ahead.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Eileen Abels

Eileen Abels

Dean and Professor, Simmons College, School of Library and Information Science
DS

Dr. Stephen Bajjaly

Wayne State University
avatar for Kristin Eschenfelder

Kristin Eschenfelder

Professor, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Kristin R. Eschenfelder (PhD, Syracuse 2000) is a Professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests focus on access and use regimes – or the complex, multi-level networks of laws, customs, technologies and... Read More →
avatar for Heidi Julien

Heidi Julien

Chair and Professor, University at Buffalo
digital literacy, information behavior, higher education


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 4.2 SIG Session: New Perspectives on School Librarianship: Embracing Innovation
This panel session will begin with 3-4 presentations on Radical Change theory in school librarianship (10-15 minutes each). This will be followed by an interactive round-table discussion which invites participants to interact with each panelist regarding issues raised by the papers, implications for practice, and future areas for research.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Ellen Pozzi

Ellen Pozzi

Assistant Professor, William Paterson University
BP

Brenda Pruitt-Annisette

Chicago State University


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 4.3 ALISE Awards and Papers
  • ALISE/Eugene Garfield Doctoral Dissertation Competition 2016
  • ALISE Research Grant Competition 2016 Preliminary Report
  • LJ/ALISE Excellence in Teaching Award

Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 4.4 A Juried Paper: Social Justice in Context: The Case of a Public Library
This research uses a mixed methods single case study approach informed by Yin (2013) to examine what the role of a public library is in relation to social justice concepts and how those concepts are understood and applied in practice to produce meaningful results, actions and outcomes for the community served. This research then builds a conceptual map that describes what emergent social justice ideals are part of the library’s practice, the connection of those ideals to social justice concepts in the philosophical literature, the corresponding actions taken in practice by the library staff, the role of the board and finally a comparison to the rational reconstruction of public library practice.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Punit Dadlani

Punit Dadlani

PhD Student (ABD), Rutgers University, United States of America
PT is a PhD student at the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University in New Brunswick. PT is also the Barham Scholar with the Center for International Scholarship in School Libraries, funded by the Carole and Norman Barham Family Foundation. His primary research... Read More →


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 4.4 B Juried Paper: Visualizing the Invisible: Finding the Gaps in Discussion of Identities in LIS
This paper is based on statistical analysis of library and information science (LIS) literature. Through searches in the Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts (LISTA) database that cross-referenced commonly used identity terms (e.g., Gender, LGBT) with terms describing prominent areas in the LIS field, we collected quantitative data and visualized our results using Gephi and Tableau Public. Our visualizations show that general identity terms are common in the literature, while discussion of particular identities is scarce. Using critical approaches to LIS, we explore the ramifications of silences within LIS literature through the lenses of critical theory and queer theory.

Speakers/Authors
JH

Jessica Hochman

Pratt Institute, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 4.4 C Juried Paper: Radical Teen Services Librarians: How Public Librarians Today Cultivate Interactivity, Connectivity, and Access
The core of Radical Change theory are three characteristics seen in texts and readers; interactivity, connectivity, and access. These characteristics equally apply to the work of teen services librarians in public libraries today. Based on 19 interviews with 20 librarians in 18 library locations across three library systems, the results illuminate contemporary practices in serving adolescents and offer guidance for educating the next generation of radical teen services librarians.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Sarah Amber Evans

Sarah Amber Evans

PhD Candidate, University of Washington, United States of America
PhD Candidate - Learning Sciences & Human Development - College of Education Research Assistant - LIFE Center University of Washington Research keywords: adolescent literacy, youth literature, popular culture, identity development, voluntary learning, learning across settings... Read More →


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 4.5 SIG Session: Teaching Ethics in Technical Services: Developing Ethical Thinking and Decision-Making in Knowledge Organization Courses
Ethics is a challenging subject to teach in technical services courses, especially knowledge organization courses. Students must understand the ethical implications of knowledge organization work and understand the limits of cataloging and metadata standards to accurately reflect all subjects and groups of people. This panel presentation will explore ways to teach ethics in knowledge organization courses and how to inspire ethical thinking and decision-making.

Speakers/Authors
GH

Gretchen Hoffman

Associate Professor, Texas Woman’s University
avatar for Maurine McCourry

Maurine McCourry

Adjunct Faculty, Dominican University
avatar for Heather Moulaison Sandy

Heather Moulaison Sandy

Associate Professor, University of Missouri
avatar for Karen Snow

Karen Snow

Associate Professor, Dominican University SOIS
Karen Snow is an Associate Professor and the PhD Program Director in the School of Information Studies at Dominican University in River Forest, IL. She teaches face-to-face and online in the areas of cataloging, classification, and metadata. She completed her PhD in Information... Read More →


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 4.6 Juried Panel: Still Struggling to Get it Right: Group Work as Innovation in LIS Pedagogy
Each panelist will discuss group work in teaching with a focus on 6 issues: student evaluations of teaching; group work in dialogue with students' technology use; using research to help us design effective group work; local contexts; course content and learning outcomes; preparation for the workplace. The panelists will then debate questions about designing, assessing, facilitating and troubleshooting group work, and the audience will be invited to divide into groups to contribute to the debate. Time will be allotted for questions and focused discussion.

Speakers/Authors
DA

Denise Agosto

Drexel University
avatar for Colette Drouillard

Colette Drouillard

Assistant Professor, Valdosta State University, United States of America
avatar for Amelia Gibson

Amelia Gibson

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Amelia Gibson is an Assistant Professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her primary research interests center on information access and poverty, critical approaches to understanding health information behavior, and... Read More →
avatar for Michelle M. Kazmer

Michelle M. Kazmer

Professor, Florida State University
KS

Kalpana Shankar

University College Dublin


Thursday January 7, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

10:00am EST

Morning Break
Thursday January 7, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.1 President's Program: A Report from the ALA Equity, Diversity Task Force

In 2014, ALA formed the Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion with a charge to "develop a plan and strategic actions to build more equity, diversity, and inclusion among our members, the field of librarianship, and our communities. The most important Task Force outcome is the public and honest conversation that will be generated by its plan and recommended actions." We can’t have this conversation without you there, so please join us as we brainstorm and discuss ideas and options for promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion both for when our association meets in Orlando in 2016 and in the years to come.


Speakers/Authors
avatar for Trevor A. Dawes

Trevor A. Dawes

Vice Provost for Libraries and Museums and May Morris University Librarian, University of Delaware
Since July 1, 2016, Trevor A. Dawes has been the vice provost for libraries and museums and May Morris University Librarian at the University of Delaware.  In this role he oversees the operations of the campus libraries, museums (three galleries) and the University of Delaware Press... Read More →
MG

Martin Garnar

University of Colorado-Colorado Springs


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.2 Juried Panel: Valuing Student Voices: Master’s Students’ Critical Perspectives on LIS Education
This session will feature three programs from two schools: the FiTS (Filling in the Spaces) program from Syracuse, the LIS Symposium from Illinois, and the GSLIS Speaks initiative from Illinois. All programs were developed by master’s students to reach their own schools and beyond in order to critically examine current practices in LIS education.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Kate McDowell

Kate McDowell

Associate Professor and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Graduate School of Library and Information Science University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
youth services, student affairs at LIS schools, research on children and apps


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

10:30am EST

Session 5.3 A Juried Paper: The Lilead Fellows Program: An Alternative Approach for Preparing School Library Leaders
The Lilead Fellows Program, funded in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, is designed to enhance the leadership skills and administrative expertise of school district library supervisors through long-term professional development (PD). This PD is achieved through the collaborative work of 25 supervisors from across the country, both in person and online over an 18-month period. Participants focus on transformational change regarding current goals in implementing 21st century skills, integrating technology, and increasing advocacy. The program takes a novel approach in its long-term deployment and in developing PD for district library supervisors, instead of building-level librarians.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Jeffrey DiScala

Jeffrey DiScala

Assistant Professor of Library Studies, OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY
CK

Christie Kodama

University of Maryland


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.3 B Juried Paper: Educating Leaders for Radical Change through Community Service
How do we prepare leaders needed to move the profession forward through radical changes and the challenges we will face in the future? In this study, we follow pre-service school librarians as they engage in community service projects of their own choosing and in their own communities. Community service allowed these future librarians to take risks and build connections with stakeholders as they developed and implemented literacy initiatives related to Dresang’s 21st century literacies,

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Sue Kimmel

Sue Kimmel

Associate Professor, Old Dominion University
Ask me about Old Dominion University's Master of Library and Information Studies.
BR

Bree Ruzzi

Old Dominion University, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.3 C Juried Paper: Towards Developing a Radical Model of Collaboration for Public Librarians and Teachers
Librarians of all types, including public librarians, have a role to play in supporting STEM education and developing multiple literacies in STEM topics. Recent evidence suggests that true collaboration between public librarians and high school teachers in STEM areas remains elusive. An educational intervention being readied for field testing is proposed for pre-service librarians and pre-service teachers. The intervention is designed to develop mutual understanding of the skills that librarians and teachers can bring to student learning, and the professional challenges each group faces. The intervention includes explicit training in inter-professional collaboration, based on models successfully applied in health contexts.

Speakers/Authors
MG

Melissa Gross

Professor, Florida State University, School of Information
avatar for Heidi Julien

Heidi Julien

Chair and Professor, University at Buffalo
digital literacy, information behavior, higher education
avatar for Don Latham

Don Latham

Professor, Florida State University, School of Information
Information literacy, digital literacies, youth services, young adult literature
avatar for Shelbie Witte

Shelbie Witte

Watson Endowed Chair, Oklahoma State University
Looking forward to learning alongside the great teachers and librarians of Iowa!


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.4 SIG Session: #SpeakingTruthToPower: Exploring Social Justice LIS Educators’ Use of Social Media in the Age of Institutional Censorship
This session features LIS social justice educators who use social media as extensions of their teaching & research agendas, in order to articulate their personal & professional commitments to diversity & inclusion. This session agenda also features social justice LIS educators whose research agenda examines growing trends in institutional censorship in the digital age. LIS social justice educators will also discuss censorship policies at their respective institutions. The goals of the session are to develop strategies and share resources for employing social media in a social justice agenda in the age of institutional censorship.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Delicia Tiera Greene

Delicia Tiera Greene

Syracuse University
New Literacies/Digital Literacies, Urban Literacies, Youth Multicultural Literature, Book Clubs, Street Literature, Culturally Relevant Pedagogy
avatar for Robin F. Kurz

Robin F. Kurz

Writer and Librarian
Ask me in person,
avatar for Safiya Umoja Noble

Safiya Umoja Noble

Assistant Prof., Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
Safiya Umoja Noble is an associate professor at UCLA, and is the Co-Founder and Co-Director of the UCLA Center for Critical Internet Inquiry.[1] She is the author of Algorithms of Oppression, and co-editor of two edited volumes: The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Class and Culture and Emotions, Technology & Design. She is a Research Associate at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. She was appointed a Commissioner to the University of Oxford... Read More →
avatar for Toni Samek

Toni Samek

Professor and Chair, University of Alberta


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

10:30am EST

Session 5.5 A Juried Paper: What’s Your Epistemology?: Quiz Design as a Pedagogical Tool in LIS Doctoral Education
Collaboratively developing an online quiz that identifies individuals’ epistemologies is an effective way to meet critical pedagogical ends in LIS doctoral education. Quiz design helps students learn to engage in epistemological perspective-taking, a requisite skill for conducting pluralist, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research. This paper will recount the process of creating an epistemology quiz in a doctoral research design course and will consider how this process successfully aligns with activity theory. The use of this quiz also supports an emerging pedagogical trend: LIS PhD programs increasingly focus on teaching research design rather than merely qualitative and/or quantitative methods.

Speakers/Authors
EL

Emily Lawrence

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, United States of America
BS

Beth Strickland

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.5 B Juried Paper: A Radical Change in LIS Doctoral Research: A Bibliometric Mapping From 1960-2013
Based on the analysis and mapping of the evolution of the interdisciplinary relations found in LIS doctoral dissertations, we found that a strong relationship between library science and information science and “Information Science” has surpassed “Library Science” and become the dominant research interest in LIS.

Speakers/Authors
FS

Fei Shu

McGill University, Canada


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.5 C Juried Paper: Fueling the Profession to Drive Change
This paper/presentation discusses the importance of recognizing and embracing the experiential learning opportunities afforded to libraries, from their LIS counterparts. These opportunities usually come in the form of student positions such as internships, practicums or field placements. This can be the fuel needed for an organization to learn how to adapt to change.

Speakers/Authors
NB

Nora Bird

University of North Carolina at Greensboro, United States of America
avatar for Michael Crumpton

Michael Crumpton

Assistant Dean for Administrative Services, NCLA President, UNC Greensboro
http://libres.uncg.edu/ir/uncg/clist.aspx?id=1946">Michael A. Crumpton, MLS, SHRM-SCP, is the Assistant Dean for Administrative Services at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Mike oversees administration of budgets, human resources and facilities; organizes and addresses... Read More →


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

Session 5.6 Juried Panel: Breaking Barriers to Information Access: New Information Literacies in Service to Wider Communities
This panel will discuss research on how the LIS scholarly agenda must be broadened to emphasize not only what is practical and doable but also relevant to wider segments of the community, including the development of more customized strategies to reach entrepreneurs, individuals with special health literacy needs, and adults who struggle with poor reading skills.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Chris Cunningham

Chris Cunningham

University of South Carolina
avatar for Liya Deng

Liya Deng

University of South Carolina
avatar for Stan Trembach

Stan Trembach

University of South Carolina
DW

Deborah Wright Yoho

University of South Carolina, United States of America
EZ

Emma Zhang

University of South Carolina, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

10:30am EST

Session 5.7 Juried Panel: Radical Change Theory Means Sustainability for LIS Education and Research
Radical change theory urges connectivity, collaboration and fresh perspectives. As the information environment evolves, practitioners are currently teaching themselves and others about "sustainability" (the ecological, economic, and equitable circumstances affected by changes to the environment) without input from LIS accredited programs. Capitalizing on Radical Change Theory’s call for interaction and new viewpoints, this presentation engages participants with why and how to make sustainability an integral part of our curriculum and outreach efforts. Panelists will involve audience members in mapping new territory for LIS education and research of local and global impact.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for John Burgess

John Burgess

Assistant Professor, University of Alabama
avatar for Clara M. Chu

Clara M. Chu

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
2014-15 ALISE President
avatar for Rachel Fleming-May

Rachel Fleming-May

Associate Professor, School of Information Sciences, The University of Tennessee
Rachel Fleming-May is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee’s School of Information Sciences. Her research and teaching interests include assessment, academic librarianship, and the intersection of creative writing and information
TJ

Tonyia J Tidline

University of Alberta


Thursday January 7, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Whittier (4th Floor)

12:15pm EST

Awards Luncheon
Thursday January 7, 2016 12:15pm - 1:45pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.1 A Juried Paper: Lacking Control: Learning Analytics and Student Privacy
Big Data has come to the classroom, and colleges and universities are exploring ways to extract nascent value hidden in troves of student data using learning analytics technology. This technology may radically change student assessment practices, personalize learning, and improve institutional efficiencies in a time of austerity in higher education. However, increased use of sensitive student data flows presents unique privacy concerns. The author argues that students should be informed about who uses their personal information, and the author states how student privacy dashboards built on top of technical identity layers can enhance student control over how their information flows.

Speakers/Authors
KM

Kyle Matthew Lauer Jones

UW-Madison, The iSchool


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.1 B Juried Paper: Exploring Eye Movements for Inferring Differences in Online Information Searching Behavior. A Case Study of American and Chinese Students.
The purpose of this study is to identify if cultural differences affect information-searching behavior of users on Google with the use of eye tracking technology. Even though cultural differences and individual cognitive style have been the main concern of several information behavior studies in the last 10 years, there are only a limited number of studies that investigate cognitive differences between online information seekers from cultural cognitive perspective.
The preliminary eye movement data (i.e. fixations and saccades) analysis shows differences in the search strategies employed by the participating groups. Overall, the Chinese participants have spent 20 minutes (in average) longer than the Americans. While the initial results support cognitive variation in the searching behaviors of participants with different ethnicities, there is a possibility that these differences are due to individual characteristics or English language proficiency and not purely cultural.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Sara Chizari

Sara Chizari

PhD Candidate & Adjunct Faculty, University of South Carolina
I am a PhD Candidate at the University of South Carolina. My research interests lie in the intersection of neuro-cognitive and cross-cultural studies of information searching behavior. I am hoping to graduate in summer 2016!


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.1 C Juried Paper: Inclusive & Connected Learning: Evaluating and Refining an Academic Community Blogging Platform
This study will contribute to a better understanding regarding how LIS student blogging communities can enhance learning experiences, encourage reflection, and afford the creation of affinity spaces. The investigator will evaluate a community blogging platform model utilized by students in the School of Information. The study will identify areas where the model is effective, and provide recommendations regarding how to improve the design of the platform to provide a positive educational impact on students, including topics such as the extent of student participation, what type of support they needed, and what aspects of the community enhanced their learning experience.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Michael Stephens

Michael Stephens

San Jose State University, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.2 A Juried Paper: Rural Public Libraries as Community Change Agents: Opportunities for health promotion
Rural residents in the U.S. are at a disadvantage with regard to health status and access to health promotion activities. In many rural communities, public libraries offer support to residents through health information provision. There are also opportunities for rural public libraries to engage in broader community health efforts. This paper reports on a collaborative effort between researchers and one rural public library in North Carolina to introduce, assess and evaluate a variety of health promotion activities including pedometer lending, and an individual health self-assessment program.

Speakers/Authors
MG

Mary Grace Flaherty

Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.2 B Juried Paper: Mind the Gap: Public Library Services for an Aging Population
An unobtrusive, secondary data analysis facilitates a comprehensive view of the current state of Canadian urban public library services, programs, collections and policies that serve older adults, and will gauge the preparedness of this essential social institution for upcoming demographic changes. While public libraries are uniquely poised to engage with older adults in the community, this study’s results indicate a need to refocus resources to better support older adults’ changing information-related needs.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Nicole K Dalmer

Nicole K Dalmer

PhD Candidate, The University of Western Ontario, Canada
Nicole Dalmer (BSc, MLIS) is a third year PhD Candidate in the Library and Information Science program at The Western University of Western Ontario. Her dissertation research examines the invisible information work done by family caregivers of older adults. She is particularly interested... Read More →


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.2 C Juried Paper: “No experience required”: radical changes in UK public libraries
The ‘Big Society’ platform in the United Kingdom (UK) has created a shift towards getting volunteers to run some, part, or all of certain public services. Through this approach, more than 300 UK public libraries have been handed over to community organizations and volunteers with varying levels of oversight from the Library Authority. These public libraries are investigated through surveys, interviews, and passive observation framed by IFLA's Public Library Manifesto and Public Library Service Guidelines.

Speakers/Authors
CB

Claire Burrows

PhD Candidate, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Claire Burrows is a second year PhD student in the Library and Information Science program at Western University. Her research pertains to the accessibility of academic libraries for students with disabilities, and how theoretical conceptualisations of disability may influence the... Read More →
HH

Heather Hill

The University of Western Ontario
Associate Professor, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, Western University


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.3 OCLC Grant Papers
Moderators
avatar for Lynn Connaway

Lynn Connaway

OCLC Research

Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.4 SIG Session: Innovation and Inclusion: Considering the Scope and Vision of Information Ethics Education
This session provides a retrospective of the first ten years of the SIG, inviting a dialogue on how we might contribute more fully to information ethics in LIS education, and offers three papers in support of the SIG’s mission to inform the theory and practice of information ethics education.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Jared Bielby

Jared Bielby

University of Alberta
avatar for Jenny Bossaller

Jenny Bossaller

Associate Professor, Missouri College of Education
JB

John Budd

University of Missouri
AJ

A. J. Million

University of Missouri
avatar for Toni Samek

Toni Samek

Professor and Chair, University of Alberta


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.5 A Juried Paper: Turning professional education inside out for the 2020 information landscape
Changes in the operating environment of information professionals have significant implications for library and information science education. The current situation requires more than the tinkering, quick fixes, and incremental changes that have generally typified the evolution of professional education. Academic programs must respond to emerging trends in the field, consider innovative thinking and ideas advanced by researchers and practitioners, and anticipate new models of service delivery. Professional education needs to embody and enact the concepts and principles that are gaining traction in all sectors of our profession. The information curriculum thus needs to be blended, integrated, embedded, collaborative, and participatory.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Sheila Corrall

Sheila Corrall

Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Information Culture & Data Stewardship
Sheila Corrall worked in UK public, special, and national libraries in acquisitions, cataloging, reference and information services, before moving into higher education, where she served as university librarian at two institutions and as CIO at a large research university. In 2004... Read More →


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.5 B Juried Paper: Designing the Future of Librarianship
Despite evidence of innovative tool and service creation throughout its history, American librarianship characterizes itself as a science-based discipline. Yet other disciplines, such as design, may offer epistemological frameworks better suited to professions that create such artifacts. This paper explores the relevance of design epistemologies to practice, research, and education in librarianship and argues for the reconceptualization of librarianship as a design discipline.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Rachel Ivy Clarke

Rachel Ivy Clarke

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.5 C Juried Paper: Reaching Across Boundaries: A Longitudinal Look at How LIS Faculty Collaborate
Replicating a study of LIS collaboration conducted in 2010, results from a 21-question survey sent to attendees of the 2015 ALISE conference are compared and contrasted with results from the earlier survey. Changes in reported behaviors or attitudes since the 2010 survey are highlighted. The results of this second study provide additional insights that may suggest ways to re-imagine interdisciplinary collaborations by LIS faculty in education, research, and service activities.

Speakers/Authors
PD

Prudence Dalrymple

Director, Institute for Health Informatics, Drexel University, United States of America
Prudence Dalrymple, PhD, MS, FMLAResearch & Teaching Professor and Director, Institute for Health Informatics The College of Computing & InformaticsDrexel University3141 Chestnut StreetPhiladelphia PA 19104Past president of ALISE
LZ

Lisl Zach

Drexel University, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

2:00pm EST

Session 6.6 SIG Session: Radical Change: Inclusion, diversity, and innovation in digital societies
SIG-Research is sponsoring a panel of scholars discussion the advantages and disadvantages of different methodological approaches to the study of inclusion, diversity, and innovation in digital societies.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for John Bertot

John Bertot

Professor, University of Maryland, College of Information Studies
PF

Pnina Fichman

Indiana University
JB

Jennifer Burek Pierce

University of Iowa
HR

Howard Rosenbaum

Indiana University
MS

Madelyn Sanfilippo

Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing, United States of America


Thursday January 7, 2016 2:00pm - 3:30pm EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

3:30pm EST

Afternoon Break
Thursday January 7, 2016 3:30pm - 4:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

3:30pm EST

3:30pm EST

4:00pm EST

ALISE Business Meeting
Thursday January 7, 2016 4:00pm - 4:45pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

4:00pm EST

4:45pm EST

Plenary Session: President's Program: Researcher: What You Got? Exploring Practice and Research
Is there a disconnect between LIS professors’ scholarly output and the practice of librarianship? Of course, there are some valuable, noteworthy studies—funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and other entities—that have influenced libraries and librarianship. But what of the plethora of articles published annually by professors building a record of research? Are they mired behind paywalls where no one will see them unless they actively seek them out? Are they what librarians need for effective improvements to practice?

This panel presentation and discussion will include overviews of recent collaborations between LIS professors and practicing librarians and a dialogue about strengthening the ties between LIS research and those in the field.

Moderators
avatar for Michael Stephens

Michael Stephens

San Jose State University, United States of America

Speakers/Authors
MG

Martin Garnar

University of Colorado-Colorado Springs
avatar for Marie Kennedy

Marie Kennedy

Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian, Loyola Marymount University
I'm the co-director of the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship and the Serials & Electronic Resources Librarian at Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles CA).
BK

Brian Kenney

White Plains Public Library
avatar for Lili Luo, PhD.

Lili Luo, PhD.

San Jose State University School of Information
Associate Professor, School of Information, San Jose State University


Thursday January 7, 2016 4:45pm - 6:15pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

6:15pm EST

ALISE Kick-Off to 2016
Thursday January 7, 2016 6:15pm - 6:30pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

7:00pm EST

8:30pm EST

 
Friday, January 8
 

7:30am EST

7:30am EST

SIG Business Meetings: Session 4

Assistant/Associate Deans & Directors
Innovative Pedagogies


Friday January 8, 2016 7:30am - 8:30am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

7:30am EST

Registration
Friday January 8, 2016 7:30am - 12:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

Exhibits
Friday January 8, 2016 8:00am - 12:00pm EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

8:00am EST

8:00am EST

unCommons

ALISE is excited to once again offer the unCommons, an exciting new way to network, share and collaborate. The unCommons is a gathering point where colleagues and contemporaries can share ideas, brainstorm and network, meet for an impromptu presentation, hold a one-on-one meeting, or engage in a lively debate! The unCommons also includes placement services information, our Internet Café, screen and projector, message board, and a station to recharge your devices. 

The unCommons hours will be Wednesday, January 6, and Thursday, January 7 from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m, and Friday, January 8 from 8 a.m. - 12 noon.


Friday January 8, 2016 8:00am - 12:00pm EST
Grand Ballroom B (Plaza) - (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 7.1 Juried Panel: Strategies for Change: Qualitative LIS Research Methods and Furthering Social Justice
This panel will discuss how qualitative data collection methods that contain implicit notions of equity and subsidiarity, the innate dignity and worth of each human person, which are the building blocks of social justice, can support and advance a social justice agenda in LIS education and research. Dialog with the audience, designed to create linkages between 1) qualitative LIS research methods and 2) social justice metatheory, will help us to articulate and expand them both, giving us leverage for LIS education, research and practice, and for working toward the radical change necessary for the shared goal of a more inclusive society.

Speakers/Authors
SL

Shari Lee

St. John's University
avatar for Bharat Mehra

Bharat Mehra

Associate Professor, UTK School of Information Sciences
Dr. Mehra's research examines diversity and intercultural communication, social justice in library and information science (LIS), critical and cross-cultural studies, and community informatics or the use of information and communication technologies to empower minority and underserved... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Rioux

Kevin Rioux

Associate Professor, St John's University


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Arlington (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 7.2 A Juried Paper: A Different Kind of Diversity: Ruminations on the (Un)attractiveness of LIS Programs to Culturally Diverse Students
We survey 57 ALA-accredited programs in Canada and the U.S. and examine the (un)attractiveness of graduate LIS education to culturally diverse students. We conclude that despite extensive research and recruitment programs related to diverse populations, the problem of cultural homogeneity in LIS academic departments and the practicing field persists. Students and alumni respond strongly and emotionally to the lack of diversity and also make suggestions to improve the situation. It is clear that a combination of recruitment efforts and radical internal restructuring in LIS programs is required for remediation. Programs need to become both more multicultural and more international.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Nadia Caidi

Nadia Caidi

University of Toronto
KD

Keren Dali

Western University, Ontario, Canada


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.2 B Juried Paper: What motivates future information professionals? It’s probably not what you think.
This research stems from LIS management class discussions on the topic of motivation, and highlights the need for radical shifts in management approaches to motivation in information organizations. Our analysis of four student cohorts shows that intrinsic motivators are far more influential than any “carrot and stick” type of approach. Future information leaders and managers should recognize that intrinsic factors play a bigger role in employee motivation, and put more effort into creating a culture of respect, recognition, trust, and autonomy when tailoring their management strategies to tap into the emotions of their coworkers.

Speakers/Authors
RS

Rajesh Singh

St. John's University, USA


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.2 C Juried Paper: Fostering Diversity in Library and Information Science Education: The FEAL (IMLS) Grant
The Fostering East Asian Librarianship (FEAL) grant, awarded to the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, was funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services in June of 2013. FEAL seeks to create highly qualified library in the area of East Asian Librarianship through education, employment, mentoring, and professional development. Ten students began the online MLIS at SOIS spring semester of 2014, with an eleventh joining in Spring of 2015. The grant provides tuition, fees, travel, and conference expenses to eleven students fluent in one or more East Asian languages who are employed at institutions housing substantial East Asian collections that employ a full-time East Asian librarian.

Speakers/Authors
WJ

Wooseob Jeong

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, United States of America
LR

Laura Ridenour

University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, United States of America


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Beacon Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.3 SIG Session: Confronting the contradictions: Professional ideals and realities for contingent faculty in LIS
Contingent faculty now make up the majority of the LIS instructional workforce, teaching close to 70% of courses in many ALA-accredited LIS programs. The literature reflects similar trends across higher education, and is raising awareness of the detrimental impact of low pay, precarious employment, and poor working conditions experienced by many adjuncts. Some institutions have made progress in ameliorating some of these problems, but the dialogue in LIS seems to be stymied by differing perceptions and unanswered questions. This session seeks to open the conversation by exploring some of the most critical issues: 1) Who are adjuncts, and how do we define them? 2) What are the existing compensation ranges and working conditions? 3) What impact does the institutional context of policies and guidelines have on the use of adjuncts? and 4) What are the implications of the growth of online learning, unbundling of teaching tasks, and shifting priorities in research and instruction? Presenters on this panel discuss these trends incorporating results of the 2014 Survey of Contingent Faculty in LIS and fall 2015 interviews with deans and directors of LIS programs.

Speakers/Authors
CS

Carla Stoffle

University of Arizona, United States of America
JS

Jennifer Sweeney

Drexel University, United States of America


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Berkeley (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 7.4 A Juried Paper: Opportunities and Challenges for Students in an Online Seminar-Style Course in LIS Education: A Qualitative Case Study
Online enrollments in U.S. higher education programs continue to grow, a trend also seen in LIS education where entire MLIS programs are being offered online. Synchronous online seminar-style courses present interesting challenges for both radical inclusion and innovation. This qualitative case study explored the effectiveness of a synchronous, online seminar conducted via Google Hangout in an MLIS program. The findings revealed similarities and differences between a face-to-face seminar and synchronous online seminar. Factors such as meaningful interactions, group collaborations, and technology literacy—hallmarks of a social constructivist learning environment, play critical roles in optimizing the learning experience.

Speakers/Authors
OF

Omer Farooq

Kent State University, United States of America
avatar for Miriam Matteson

Miriam Matteson

Kent State University, United States of America


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.4 B Juried Paper: Radically Changing Collaboration: Development of Community in an Online School Library Course
To properly prepare pre-service school librarians, school library educators in online courses must provide opportunities for collaborative engagement, while recognizing the pedagogical benefit of the organic formation of communities of practice that develop within an established third space, or area outside of content. This study examines the integration of third space constructs used to facilitate collaboration within a digital community of practice.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Sue Kimmel

Sue Kimmel

Associate Professor, Old Dominion University
Ask me about Old Dominion University's Master of Library and Information Studies.
avatar for Old Dominion University

Old Dominion University

Old Dominion University Library & Information Studies
Old Dominion University proudly offers the only Master of Library and Information Studies degree in Virginia and prepares students with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills that will enable them to become highly proficient librarians, media specialists, and information authorities... Read More →


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Cambridge (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

8:30am EST

Session 7.5 SIG Session: Stories of Change and Inclusion in LIS Education, 1890 - 1950
The three papers in this session use a historical lens to investigate radical change and inclusion in LIS education. The first paper examines the efforts during the early years of the profession to construct librarianship as a masculine profession and the effect this had on the structure and form of education for librarianship. The second paper traces the impact of the Julius Rosenwald Fund Library Program on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The third paper focuses on radical change in the evaluation criteria that early youth services librarians were trained to use for selecting materials in children's library collections.

Moderators
avatar for C. Sean Burns

C. Sean Burns

Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky
avatar for Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Susan Rathbun-Grubb

Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina
I teach courses in information organization, library technical services, and social science information services. My research interests are related LIS careers and workforce, LIS history, and pedagogy,

Speakers/Authors
CA

Christine A. Jenkins

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Aisha M. Johnson

Aisha M. Johnson

head of Special Collections and Archives, University of North Florida
As a graduate student, Johnson investigated diversity needs in the field of Library and Information Science, which sparked her commitment to improve the field’s diversity needs and conditions of small repository archives. Johnson has a permanent dedication to uncovering the library... Read More →
avatar for Suzanne M. Stauffer

Suzanne M. Stauffer

Associate Professor, Louisiana State University


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Clarendon (Mezzanine)

8:30am EST

Session 7.6 A Juried Paper: Development of Empathy and Emotional Intelligence in a Public Library Leadership Curriculum
Emotional intelligence and empathy have been identified as important traits for people in management and leadership positions. Emotional intelligence (EI) is a set of abilities that includes self-control, self-awareness, flexibility, and teamwork. This presentation describes implementation of a program designed to increase empathy and emotional intelligence in a public library leadership program.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Denice Adkins

Denice Adkins

Associate Professor, School of Information Science & Learning Technologies


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.6 B Juried Paper: Uncovering Cultural Heritage through Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) within the Division of Library and Information Science (DLIS) Program at St. John's University
This paper presents how one professor within St. John’s University’s Division of Library and Information Science (DLIS) program utilizes the Academic Service-Learning pedagogy, a classroom/experiential site-based program that requires students to perform community service that benefits the common (public) good and uses that service to illustrate course concepts. Students are taught in class how to digitize and describe cultural heritage objects. Then, utilizing the AS-L platform, students gain practical experience in engaging in the process of information representation utilizing the concept of Social Justice, with an eye toward providing a voice for the under- and misrepresented.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Christine M. Angel

Christine M. Angel

Associate Professor, St. John's University
Dr. Christine M. Angel is an Associate Professor within the Division of Library & Information Science at St. John’s University. Prior to joining the Division in September 2012, she worked as a Digital Librarian at the University of South Carolina’s Thomas Cooper Library. Dr. Angel... Read More →



Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.6 C Juried Paper: The less you teach, the better: An inclusive framework and pedagogy to support radical change
What is needed to develop LIS professionals who can support radical change? Technological determinism and technocentrism are powerful forces which obscure the integration of the social and technical as enmeshed processes. By promoting a Critical Interpretive Sociotechnical framework for LIS education, we propose that technology education is inherently political and must be challenged to encourage inclusion of non-dominant voices and support societal needs. We present a methodology from leadership education, Case-in-Point teaching, to teach such a framework and provide illustrative examples for its application and use.

Speakers/Authors

Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
White Hill (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.7 A Juried Paper: How accessible is accessible? An analysis of academic library websites
Within this study, the social model of disability and Sen’s capability approach are utilized to analyze accessibility-related information at ten academic libraries in Canada. The goal of this research is to determine how these libraries understand and prioritize “disability” and “accessibility,” and whether current practices can be improved upon in order to develop more inclusive and accessible services for students with disabilities.

Speakers/Authors
CB

Claire Burrows

PhD Candidate, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Claire Burrows is a second year PhD student in the Library and Information Science program at Western University. Her research pertains to the accessibility of academic libraries for students with disabilities, and how theoretical conceptualisations of disability may influence the... Read More →


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Whittier (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.7 B Juried Paper: Potential applications of disability theory in LIS
This study examines the existing academic literature pertaining to the accessibility of libraries for users with disabilities in order to develop a case for the use of disability theory in LIS. The ultimate goal of the study is to begin to develop a more holistic understanding of disability and accessibility practices within LIS, and in doing so to develop more inclusive strategies for supporting the information needs of users with disabilities.

Speakers/Authors
CB

Claire Burrows

PhD Candidate, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Claire Burrows is a second year PhD student in the Library and Information Science program at Western University. Her research pertains to the accessibility of academic libraries for students with disabilities, and how theoretical conceptualisations of disability may influence the... Read More →


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Whittier (4th Floor)

8:30am EST

Session 7.7 C Juried Paper: Diversity of Participation, Thought, and Action: Museum Programming for Special Needs Children and Its Social Value
This paper investigates the effect of learning in museums, an informal environment different from the traditional classroom, on children with special needs. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a standardized scale, observations, parental surveys, and pre- and post-activity task evaluations. The results revealed a positive impact of museum learning on knowledge acquisition and socialization demonstrated by increases in the total number of the participants’ information sharing and communication behaviors. The paper also intends to stimulate dialogue between special needs communities and the cultural sector about the role of social justice principles in making cultural and educational institutions more inclusive.

Speakers/Authors
avatar for Liya Deng

Liya Deng

University of South Carolina


Friday January 8, 2016 8:30am - 10:00am EST
Whittier (4th Floor)

10:00am EST

Morning Break
Friday January 8, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am EST
Statler (Mezzanine)

10:30am EST

President's Session: President's Program: The Ethics and Values of our Profession
The plethora of ways information permeates, shapes, and transforms our lives and work means that the capabilities of Library or other Information Professional will continue to change as they reflect the diverse ways we contribute to Information creation, discovery, access, and use. This diversity in the information domains makes ethics and values the DNA shared by all of us from School Librarians to Information Architects. This Panel looks at the core values and ethical characteristics which lie at the heart of our profession. Panelists will begin the discussion by asking: What values or ethical principles bind us? How do we inculcate them in our students? How do we measure whether they have acquired them? How different do our core values and ethical principles look in different information settings? 

Moderators
avatar for Seamus Ross

Seamus Ross

Professor, UofToronto and Member of the Europeana Research Board
Seamus Ross is Professor in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto and served as Dean for seven years (2009-2015). During 2015 and 2016 he served as Interim Director of the Marshall McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology. Before joining Toronto, he was Professor... Read More →

Speakers/Authors

Friday January 8, 2016 10:30am - 12:00pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

12:00pm EST

COA Meeting
Friday January 8, 2016 12:00pm - 1:00pm EST
Georgian (Mezzanine)

12:00pm EST